Carlos Schrago

Carlos Schrago

Associate Professor
Carlos

Education:

•          2004: Ph.D., Genetics. Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

•          2000: B.Sc., Biological Sciences. Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

 

Work history:

•          2015-date: Associate Professor of Genetics and Evolution, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro.

•          2006-2015: Assistant Professor of Genetics and Evolution, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro.

•          2012-2014: Head of the Graduate Program in Genetics, UFRJ, Brazil.

•          2006: Lecturer of Genetics and Evolution, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro.

 

Research interests

I am broadly interested in evolutionary genetics, using mainly primates as a case study. My works have addressed questions from pattern-oriented disciplines, such as biogeography, to process-related fields, such as molecular evolution. Theoretical approaches aiming to unify those large areas of biological enquiry are deeply appealing to me.

 

Selected publications:

For full list of publications from my group, please visit here.

  • Schrago CG, Aguiar BO & Mello B. 2018. Comparative evaluation of maximum parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic reconstruction using empirical morphological data. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 31: 1477–1484.
  • Schrago CG. 2014. The limiting distribution of the effective population size of the ancestor of humans and chimpanzees. Journal of Theoretical Biology 357: 55–61.
  • Schrago CG, Menezes AN, Furtado C, et al. 2014. Multispecies coalescent analysis of the early diversification of neotropical primates: Phylogenetic inference under strong gene trees/species tree conflict. Genome Biology and Evolution 6: 3105–3114.
  • Schrago CG. 2014. The effective population sizes of the anthropoid ancestors of the human-chimpanzee lineage provide insights on the historical biogeography of the great apes. Molecular Biology and Evolution 31: 37–47.
  • Schrago CG, Mello B & Soares AER. 2013. Combining fossil and molecular data to date the diversification of New World Primates. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 26: 2438–2446.